Heat Treatment VS. Cryonite

There’s been a lot of discussion about heat treatment versus Cryonite when it comes to the elimination of bed bugs. The heat treatment people say that heat does the best job of eradication and the Cryonite people say that that does the best job of elimination. Who can you believe? The following is taken from the official National Pest Management Associations Guidelines on Best Management Practices for controlling Bed Bugs in Multi family Housing :

  • 11.3.3. Heat Treatments
    • 11.3.3.1. Heat treatment can be used to treat and control bed bugs in:
      • 11.3.3.1.1. A whole structure.
      • 11.3.3.1.2. An apartment unit, a room, or a portion of a room.
      • 11.3.3.1.3. A compartment containing furniture and possessions.
    • 11.3.3.2. Heat treatments typically provide more flexibility for use in cluttered environments than traditional pesticide applications
    • 11.3.3.3. Research and understand applicable fire codes, and local ordinances regarding the use of portable heaters, fire suppression systems and other heat treatment related concerns.
    • 11.3.3.4. Only equipment designed and tested for use as an insect control device should be used for whole room bed bug heat treatments.
    • 11.3.3.5. Heat equipment should be carefully inspected before use to ensure that it is in proper working order and no foreseeable fire hazards exist.
    • 11.3.3.6. When conducting whole-room heat treatment ensure that the equipment has the capacity to raise and hold the temperature in the treated area to a level lethal to bed bugs.
      • 11.3.3.6.1. Typical items to be heat treated include beds, furniture, personal possessions, clothing, shoes, and equipment.
      • 11.3.3.6.2. Various enclosures can be used including trucks, trailers, shipping containers, storage pods, specially designed self-contained heating units, or tarps.
      • 11.3.3.6.3. Ambient air temperature should be monitored to avoid damage to heat sensitive items.
      • 11.3.3.6.4. Recommended temperature and exposure periods are provided in Appendix B.
    • 11.3.3.7. Heat treatment can be limited by these factors:
      • 11.3.3.7.1. Insulated areas where it is difficult to raise the temperature to levels sufficient to achieve complete kill.
      • 11.3.3.7.2. Poor air flow in a room or container resulting in cool spots.
      • 11.3.3.7.3. Poorly insulated rooms or containers during cold weather
      • 11.3.3.7.4. Construction features that may contribute to heat loss or insulated cold spots.
      • 11.3.3.7.5. The possible ability of bed bugs to move out of heated areas in whole-room treatments.
      • 11.3.3.7.6. Potential heat damage to certain materials, including the risk of activating automatic fire suppression systems (sprinklers). Care should be taken to safeguard these materials and systems.
    • 11.3.3.8. For whole-room heat treatment, the preventive use of insecticide in walls and under carpet edges, prior to treatment, may complement treatment by killing bugs attempting to move away from the heat.
    • 11.3.3.9. Containerized heat treatment can be used to supplement traditional bed bug service by killing bed bugs and eggs in items that are difficult to treat using other methods.
      • 11.3.3.9.1. Typical items to be heat treated include beds, furniture, personal possessions, clothing, shoes, appliances, and equipment.
      • 11.3.3.9.2. Various enclosures can be used including trucks, trailers, shipping containers, storage pods, specially designed self-contained heating units, or tarps.
  • 11.3.4. Mattress and Box Spring Encasements
    • 11.3.4.1. Mattress and box spring encasements can be a useful tool for bed bug control.
    • 11.3.4.2. Encasements create a barrier to bed bug movement in and out of the mattress, box spring, and pillows, by trapping and starving bed bugs inside.
    • 11.3.4.3. Encasements make subsequent inspection easier because bed bugs are more visible on the encasement by eliminating harborage areas in the box spring and mattress.
    • 11.3.4.4. Not all encasements protect against bed bugs; only use those demonstrated as being “bed bug-proof,” “bite-proof,” and “escape-proof.”
    • 11.3.4.5. Encasements allow residents to salvage an infested bed rather than dispose of it.
    • 11.3.4.6. Before encasements are installed, a pest control professional should vacuum, steam or treat the mattress and box spring to remove and kill as many bugs as possible.
  • 11.3.5. Cold “Freeze” Treatments
    • 11.3.5.1. Freeze treatments use extreme low temperatures to kill bed bugs and eggs on contact.
    • 11.3.5.2. Freeze treatments can be applied to most surfaces and so may be beneficial in treating bed bug-infested items that otherwise are difficult to treat including toys, plastics, books, and other items.
    • 11.3.5.3. This technology leaves no residual and is used primarily for killing bed bugs and eggs on contact.

So there you have it from the experts. They both have pluses and minuses but when it comes to whole unit treatment and for getting into items especially where there is a lot of clutter heat is the method that is most recommended. This video shows the best heat treatment bed bug control in NYC

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